Concepts of inspiration

/ Terpsichora Ouranía Melpomene Polymnia Erato Kalliope Kleio Euterpe Thaleia /

.

Inspiration refers to an unconscious burst of creativity in a literary, musical, or other artistic endeavour. The concept has origins in both Hellenism and Hebraism. The Greeks believed that inspiration or enthusiasm came from the muses, as well as the gods Apollo and Dionysus. Inspiration is also a divine matter in Hebrew poetics. In the Book of Amos the prophet speaks of being overwhelmed by God’s voice and compelled to speak. In the 18th century philosopher John Locke proposed a model of the human mind in which ideas associate or resonate with one another in the mind. In the 19th century, Romantic poets such as Coleridge and Shelley believed that inspiration came to a poet because the poet was attuned to the (divine or mystical) winds and because the soul of the poet was able to receive such visions.

Any finite number divided by infinity is as near to nothing as makes no odds, so the average population of all the planets in the Universe can be said to be zero…

In the early 20th century, psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud located inspiration in the inner psyche of the artist. Psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung’s theory of inspiration suggests that an artist is one who was attuned to racial memory, which encoded the archetypes of the human mind. Further, inspiration could come directly from the subconscious.

Cosmic forces at the scale of infinite
Iuppiter Optimus Maximus 
Saturnius Mons
Neptunalia; Lectisternium 

.



.